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Best Scupper Plugs of 2020

Updated On April 25, 2020

Kayaking is a popular and enjoyable hobby. But, a common problem when people are out on their kayaks is that water definitely starts to get into it. And unless you manually scoop the water out, there is a tendency that you’ll find yourself slowly sinking lower and lower into the water. That is unless you have the best scupper plugs on hand. 

Scupper plugs are used to plug in those scupper holes at the side of your kayak. These holes are meant to allow water to flow out of your kayak but it is also a common entry point for water to get in. In order to effectively keep the water out, this list of the best scupper plugs should help you out. If you’re not sure how to use and pick the right plug to use, a guide on scupper plugs is at the end.

Our top pick for the best scupper plugs this year is the Universal Scupper Plugs.

Quick Summary: Top 7 - Best Scupper Plugs of 2020


Our seasoned editors have picked and rated these products for each specific category and area of expertise to recommend you the best models and products we can. We receive commission from some of these affiliate links.
Best Overall: 1. Universal Scupper Plugs
These universal scupper plugs are made of a simple rubber cone and handy rope. The size and design allows the plugs to fit into most scupper holes.
Best Design: 2. H2O Quality Kayak Scupper Plugs
The moulded nylon material and tiered design are efficient in sealing off a kayak. The plug tightly fits scupper holes less than an inch in diameter.
Best Value: 3. Ocean Kayak Scupper Plugs
The ribbed design on this Ocean Kayak Scupper plug allows it to fit tightly into most scupper holes. The 2 plug pack is available in multiple colors, sizes and at an affordable cost.
Best Material: 4. Seattle Sports Kayak Scuppers
Made from a solid silicone material, the Seattle Sports Kayak Scuppers feature a multi-tiered design that is sturdy, flexible, and efficient at keeping your kayak dry.
Best Deal: 5. Harmony Gear Scupper Hole Plugs
The Harmony Gear Scupper Hole Plugs come in a pack of 4 hard rubber scupper hole plugs. Inserting, removing, and storing these plugs is quite easy because of its form.
Best Fit: 6. Pelican Scupper Plugs
The compressible EVA material that makes up these Pelican Scupper Plugs are what allow it to fit well into scupper holes with less than 1.25 inch diameter.
Best Package:  7. Gimiton Marine Scupper Plugs
Available in a 4-pack, 6-pack, and 8-pack, these Gimiton Scupper Plugs are made of a hard rubber material with a standard multi-tiered design.
Top 3 Quick Comparison

Our Reviews


Best Overall
Available in packs of 4, these universal scupper plugs have a simple design. A rubber cone is used as the main plug that fits into the scupper holes.
Quick Specs
  • Material: Rubber and Rope
  • Size: 0.8 x 1.5 x 1.5 inches
Available in packs of 4, these universal scupper plugs have a simple design. A rubber cone is used as the main plug that fits into the scupper holes. The rubber is soft but feels quite durable at the same time. A knotted rope is tied to the rubber cone, allowing kayakers to easily tug onto this rope to remove the scupper plug. The build is very simple but it is a practical design that is made to fit into 0.75-1.5 inch holes which you will find in most kayaks.

There are actually different color options to choose from. A royal blue, bright green and red are the three colors available. The knotted rope on all these eptions, however, is only black. This kayak accessory is relatively cheap but can last you for quite a while. One of the downsides, however, is that the rope tends to wear out faster than the rubber cone. However, the rope can actually be replaced easily by replacing it with a new piece that you simply need to tie through the cone.
  • Simple Design and Build
  • Multiple Color Options
  • Rope can easily wear out
Product Review
"These work great for plugging the scupper valves on the back of our boat when we launch at the ramp, keeps the water from coming up the scuppers and getting into the boat and they work great as butt plugs if you have too much gas."
Best Design
The H2O Quality Kayak Scupper plugs are made from a moulded nylon material fitted into a rather complex screw-like design. 
Quick Specs
  • Material: Moulded Nylon
  • Size: ¾ inch
The H2O Quality Kayak Scupper plugs are made from a molded nylon material fitted into a rather complex screw-like design. The top is a thin handle that is used to twist the scupper plug into the scupper holes tighter or to twist it out and remove. This plug is made specifically for sit-on-top and touring kayaks. However, it can still be used for holes that have a ¾-inch diameter. 

The design is quite efficient in keeping water out. The screw-like top allows it to fit in perfectly into a scupper hole while a blue washer acts as a stopper that keeps the water out. The top portion of the plug is a convenient handle that is easy to twist. Overall, the design of this scupper plug helps it seal a kayak quite successfully.
  • Efficient Design
  • Easy to Plug in and Remove
  • Not a Universal Fit
Product Review
"Perfect fit. Great Value. Seems to be of a reasonable quality."
Best Value
The Ocean Kayak Scupper Plugs feature a multi-ribbed design made out a stiff rubber material. The plugs come in packs of two and are available in multiple sizes and colors. 
Quick Specs
  • Material: Rubber and Rope
  • Size (Diameter): 1 - 1.25 inch (XS), 1.25 - 1.5 inch (S), 1.5 - 1.75 inch (M), 1.75 - 2 inch (L)
The Ocean Kayak Scupper Plugs feature a multi-ribbed design made out a stiff rubber material. The plugs come in packs of two and are available in multiple sizes and colors. At the end of the ribbed plug is a small hole where a rope is tied through. The knot serves as an easy piece that can be used to pull out and remove the scupper plugs from the hole. 

The color options include the green, red, blue, and yellow options. The sizes actually correspond with the colors, with the green being a pack of extra small plugs, yellow small plugs, blue medium plugs, and red large plugs. 

These plugs are made to fit round scupper holes. Unfortunately, these cannot efficiently seal kayaks with oval-shaped holes. On a round hole, however, the stoppers are very efficient in keeping water out. With the varied size options available, it is quite easy to find a good fit for your specific kayak. The rubber material feels soft but is actually very stiff so you might need a light hammer to really fit the plugs in tightly.
  • Multiple Size and Color Options
  • Stiff Rubber Material
  • Efficient Multi-ribbed Design
  • Fits Round Holes Only
Product Review
"They fit great. I used a wooden dowel and mallet to get them nice and snug. They stick out 1/2 - 1 inch. My scupper holes are in the footwells so they aren't obtrusive at all."
Best Material
This multi-tiered silicone scupper plug from Seattle Sports is a sturdy yet flexible material which is neon green and glow in the dark.
Quick Specs
  • Material: Solid Silicone
  • Size: Top ring 1.84 inch diameter; 2 inches height
This multi-tiered silicone scupper plug from Seattle Sports is a sturdy yet flexible material that is neon green and glows in the dark. Another color option is a camouflage black and white version which also glows in the dark. The material and color finish makes it very easy to spot the scupper plugs even in the dark. The tiered design allows the plug to fit into most scupper holes while the heavy-duty material is made to last long. The top ring has a rounded silicon handle through which people can insert a rope or thread. While the handle can be pulled directly to remove the scupper plug, having an attached rope will make it easier. (1)

The material is very soft and flexible but is sturdy enough to seal off water from the kayak. The tiered design makes it easy to push the plugs in. Pulling them out requires a good amount of pull. While these scuppers are a universal fit for round scupper holes, oval-shaped scupper holes cannot be sealed in with these plugs.
  • Durable Silicone Material
  • Glow in the Dark Color
  • Efficient tiered design
  • Does Not Fit All Scupper Holes
Product Review
"Product fit well in the two scuppers beneath the seat in my Perception Sport Pescador 12… First trip out with these was a 4 mile flat water paddle and the seat stayed dry the whole time. I would highly recommend..."
Best Deal
This pack of 4 scupper plugs from Harmony Gear is a good deal. With 4 scupper plugs, you will have most of your scupper holes covered, and maybe even have a few spare plugs.
Quick Specs
  • Material: Hard Rubber
  • Size: 1.5 inch diameter
This pack of 4 scupper plugs from Harmony Gear is a good deal. With 4 scupper plugs, you will have most of your scupper holes covered, and maybe even have a few spare plugs. The hard rubber material is quite stiff but because of the concave interior, it can actually squeeze into smaller scupper holes. 

The top portion has an extended portion which is used to pull the plug out of the hole. While this lid-like extension is a bit difficult to pull at times, especially when the plug is burrowed deep into the hole, there is also another small hole where kayakers can insert an extra thread or rope to help when pulling the plug out.

This scupper plug has a very simple design. The empty interior makes it easy to store the scupper plugs because you can simply fit one on top of the other, keeping everything in place. 
  • Simple Plug Design
  • Easy to Store
  • Stiff Rubber Material
  • Difficult to Pull Out
  • Single Size Plug
Product Review
"These plugs fit my Tarpon Kayak perfectly. The rubber is quite pliable and makes a great seal. I strung them on a length of elastic cord to prevent loss and ease of storage."
Best Fit
The Pelican Scupper Plugs are made from a compressible Ethylene-vinyl acetate(EVA) material.
Quick Specs
  • Material: Compressive EVA Material 
  • Size: 1.25 inch diameter; 1.5 inch height
The Pelican Scupper Plugs are made from a compressible Ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) material. EVA is a rubber polymer that can squeeze well into smaller areas. The material allows the scupper plug to fit into scupper holes with a diameter smaller than the actual plug. The plug has a diameter of 1.25 inches but can fit tightly into most holes smaller than that. Putting the plugs in is quite easy since the softness and flexibility of the material make it easy to push. The compressed material gives the plug a good fit and is also an efficient water barrier as well. (​2)

When the plugs are in the scupper holes, pulling them out is also simple since the plugs have a thin cord tied around it. The cord is knotted at one end to give kayakers some leverage as they pull the plug out. These scupper plugs come in packs of four.
  • Compressible EVA Material
  • Easy to Pull Out
  • Too small for other Scupper Holes
Product Review
"I used the plugs on my Future Beach 10ft fishing kayak. They worked great and kept the water out. As far as I could tell, they did not leak at all."
Best Package
These Gimiton Marine Scupper Plugs come in packages of 4, 6, or 8. These plugs are made of a simple black hard rubber material which is durable and stiff. 
Quick Specs
  • Material: Hard Rubber
  • Size: 1.2 inch diameter; 1.4 inch height
These Gimiton Marine Scupper Plugs come in packages of 4, 6, or 8. These plugs are made of a simple black hard rubber material that is durable and stiff. It is a bit flexible but is not as soft as other silicone or rubber plugs. The diameter of the plugs is 1.2 inches, which allows it to fit and seal most standard kayak scupper holes. Unfortunately, the plugs are not able to fit really small holes or larger holes which puts some limit to the usage of these plugs. However, with holes that are 1-1.2 inches in diameter, these plugs are a really good fit. 

The plugs have tiered design, with 3 different levels, all with the same diameter. The top of the plug has an upright rubber handle where an opening is available to allow a rope or cord to go through. 
  • Hard and Durable Rubber Material
  • Package of 8 Plugs Available
  • Limited Size
  • Material is not that flexible
Product Review
"I have a Lifetime Tahoma 100 kayak that I got from Walmart and it has 6 scupper holes and these worked great. There are 3 sets of scupper holes in my boat and they are different sizes and depths and these fit all of them."

Things To Consider Before Buying Scupper Plugs

Kayaking is one of the most popular water sports in North America. Whether you’re an athlete that’s looking for top-of-the-line equipment that will help with their performance or a hobbyist that’s basking in the natural beauty of the bodies of water in the American countryside, having a scupper plug for your kayak is paramount in keeping your kayak in good condition. Although not used all the time, scupper plugs are handy if you want to have a comfortable and dry experience when kayaking. 

Sit-on-top (SOT) kayaks are a form of kayak that’s getting more popular as time goes by. People are phasing out their sit-inside (SIS) kayaks with their SOT kayaks since there’s no ‘inside’ which makes it more accessible. In warmer states, SOT kayaks are one of the most popular kayaks since it’s cooler. However, Sit-on-top kayaks also have scupper holes that are designed to drain water from your ride. Although scupper holes can keep water off your kayak, it can also be an entryway for water which can cause discomfort for most paddlers. 

So what’s one of the best ways of keeping yourself dry when you’re kayaking? 

Scupper plugs are one of the best ways of keeping water off your kayak. But what are scupper plugs used for? What are some of the best qualities that we should look out for when getting a scupper plug? We’ll be guiding you in your search for a good scupper plug.

What is a Scupper Plug

As the name suggests, these plugs are designed to stop water from entering the scupper holes of your kayaks. Even though scupper holes have been designed to drain water, this can also be a way for water to get into your kayak. The last thing that you want is water stagnating inside your kayak which can compromise the buoyancy of your boat. Additionally, keeping yourself dry on a kayak can ease any discomfort when water seeps into your clothing and your kayaking shoes.

Moreover, when you’re on a sit on top kayak, there’s less protection from the elements on the upper portion of the kayak. Compared to Sit-inside kayaks that have a protective upper portion that stops splashes and waves from getting inside your boat, sit on top kayaks don’t have that luxury which makes sense on why SOT kayaks have to scupper holes. However, not all bodies of water in North America will be rough; most of the time, you’ll be deep and open water and you won’t have to deal with rough waves and splashes. 

When the water is calm and you won’t be facing strong waves any time soon, then having a scupper plug is highly recommended. When water doesn’t get inside your kayak’s cockpit, having scupper plugs will help increase the speed and performance of your kayak. 

However, people who kayak need to be aware that when you’re mounting scupper plugs on your boat’s holes, you are also trapping them inside your kayak. It’s best to keep this in mind when choosing you should be using your plugs. 

Do All Kayaks need Scuppers

As the name suggests, these plugs are designed to stop water from entering the scupper holes of your kayaks. Even though scupper holes have been designed to drain water, this can also be a way for water to get into your kayak. The last thing that you want is water stagnating inside your kayak which can compromise the buoyancy of your boat. Additionally, keeping yourself dry on a kayak can ease any discomfort when water seeps into your clothing and your kayaking shoes.

To keep the long story short: No, not all kayaks use scupper plugs, but it is recommended that you keep some when you’re using a sit on top kayak. Sit inside kayaks don’t necessarily need scupper holes since the upper portion of the kayak has a protective ‘cockpit’ that sheds water off your kayak. Scupper plugs are also a good way of getting overwashed water back out of your boat.

Sit on top kayaks have at least one or two parts of the vessel that are sealed off from water which makes only the cockpit vulnerable to water. 

Although marketed as something that’s waterproof, scupper plugs will still let in a bit of water. You won’t have to worry about your kayak sinking since kayaks are made out of buoyant and extremely durable materials. Although a small amount of water pooling on your kayak might not be a problem, it can still accumulate. When a good amount of water gets trapped inside your kayak, this can slow down your kayak and make it heavier. 

But just like any vigorous activity that you’re partaking in, it’s always recommended that you check your kayak if the plugs and the holes are in the right condition; this will mitigate any future damages to your kayak.

How To Use Scupper Plugs

When mounting scupper plugs to your kayak, you will see that there is a seam with 2 pieces of metal being fastened together. This can become a possible entryway for water depending on the quality of the materials used for the kayak.

Before mounting your scupper plugs, it’s best to look at the exterior of your kayak if there are any superficial damage and punctures to the hull. 

Testing It Out
Before you get feet wet with your kayak, it’s recommended that you first test out your scupper plugs for leaks. A good practice that most kayak enthusiasts do is that they fill their boat with water while it’s on dry land. You’ll be able to determine any signs of leakage close to your plugs when water will start to seep through. It’s also recommended that you look outside and underneath the kayak so you can see any other leaks that might not be from the plug. This is considered by many as the best way to know any forms of damages on your kayak while saving you tons of time.

Getting Rid Of Water
Whether you like it or not, you’re bound to get wet when you’re on your kayak. At the end of the day, you’ll need to get out of the kayak to drag it to dry land. Additionally, there will be instances that the weather won’t be cooperating and so you will have to expect water to get inside your kayak’s interiors. There is a wide variety of ways in keeping your kayak dry and disposing excess water from your kayak. However, these methods are not guaranteed to be 100% waterproof.

First, you can simply use a pail to scoop up water and then remove it out of your kayak. Although this isn’t the most effective way of removing water from your cockpit, it will help lighten a load of your boat long enough for you to get to dry land. 

Secondly, another way of removing water from your kayak is through a heavy-duty sponge. Sponges are one of the best ways of soaking water from your kayak since it’s cheap, can help clean hard-to-reach places, and easily replaceable. The only drawback to sponges is that it can mold if you’re not drying them up. 

Thirdly, you can use a bilge pump to remove water. This simple device will let you pump water out of your vessel by pumping it up and down. You can easily buy this from a store that sells tools or equipment for kayaks for around 30 dollars. The price of the bilge pump will depend on the quality of the product.

Finally, a drain plug can also be used to drain water off your kayak. This is especially important on sit-in kayaks since these won’t have any scupper holes to naturally drain the water. Some sit on top kayaks will have drain plugs just in case water will get into enclosed compartments of the kayak. If a pail or a bilge pump won’t be able to dispose of the water faster, then a drain plug is the final resort in making sure that your kayak won’t be overburdened by water. 

Kayakers have to remember that having water inside your kayak is perfectly normal. Water will always find a way inside your kayak whether you’re in calm or turbulent waters. As long as the amount of water is not large enough and won’t be impeding the performance of you and your kayak, then there’s no need to panic. Having a moist puddle on your kayak can be uncomfortable for your feet or shoes, but this will ultimately be negligible. 

Scupper Plug Alternatives


Pool Noodle
Pook noodles are one of the cheaper ways of plugging leaks on your kayak. It might look like it’s going to soak water, but it’s a good waterproof alternative that also has buoyant characteristics. This can serve as a temporary plug for your kayak but shouldn’t be used as a permanent solution. Moreover, it’s highly recommended that you use a scupper plug if you’re going to use your kayak for competitive events.

If you’re going to be using your kayak for sporting events, it is recommended to use a scupper plug instead of a makeshift plug in the form of a pool noodle. Pool noodles will be able to hold out temporarily, but it won’t guarantee you that water won’t be able to get inside your kayak’s hull. 

Rubber Corks
Much of the kayaking community have been using rubber corks as an alternative to scupper plugs. Corks are known for their buoyant characteristics while also keeping water away from your kayak’s interiors. The durable and flexible material used for these corks makes it a good alternative to scupper plugs.

However, it is always a good choice to use equipment that has been designed for their function. These alternatives might be able to do this in the short-term, but it will eventually crack and wear out from the stress. 

Scupper Valves
Although not necessarily an ‘alternative’, scupper valves are one of the better forms of scupper plugs that you can find in any sporting store. Compared to your regular scupper plug that will trap water inside your kayak, scupper valves are able to let the water out on the bottom part of the valve while also keeping the water from entering. 

How to Pick the Best Scupper Plugs

Even though there will be a multitude of factors that you’ll need to weigh-in, it will all boil down to your personal preference when choosing the right scupper plug. In most cases, higher quality kayaks will have their own built-in scupper plugs. However, cheaper models of kayaks will mean that you’ll have to purchase your own.

Just like every other material in the kayak industry, the quality of the product will also dictate the price of the plugs. The cheapest plugs will cost around $1 - $5, while the higher quality ones will cost around $20. 

Here are some features of a scupper plug that you have to take into account:

Durability
First and foremost, having a durable scupper plug will help mitigate any future leakages to your kayak. It’s best to get one that has high tensile strength, flexible and can withstand impacts from rocks and solid surfaces.

Scupper plugs are also made with a variety of different materials, with some being made with plastic, rubber, and stainless steel. Certain materials tend to expand and recede when exposed to fluctuating temperatures. If you have a metal plug, it’s going to recede when exposed to colder temperatures. A plug that’s more vulnerable to changes in temperature makes it more susceptible to leaks. Moreover, you’ll also have to do some research on whether your plugs are resistant to rusting and impacts. 

Longevity
Although certain scupper plugs are cheap and can be easily replaced in the market, there are also some high-quality designs that have a heftier price than the low-quality ones. Higher quality scupper plugs will last longer since they tend to be designed in the long-term for competitive sporting events.

Not a lot of people look at the warranty of scupper plugs, but they do give you a good impression of how long the product will last. If a scupper plug will have a warranty that will last the product’s lifespan, then that means that the manufacturers are confident of the durability of the plugs. 

Even though these factors will play an important part in keeping you and your kayak’s interiors dry, it will ultimately boil down to how it will fit your kayak. Each scupper plug will have a unique size which means that some will fit while others won’t fit at all.
Top Pick
Best Overall
These Gimiton Marine Scupper Plugs come in packages of 4, 6, or 8. These plugs are made of a simple black hard rubber material which is durable and stiff. 
References
(1) silicone - https://www.thoughtco.com/what-is-silicone-4164214 
(2) Ethylene-vinyl acetate - https://www.britannica.com/science/ethylene-vinyl-acetate

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